New Sniper Rifle for Airborne Units

| July 3, 2019

Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System (CSASS). (Chris Oleary/Army)

This new rifle is more compact and lends itself to operating in cramped conditions… Like the environment experienced by units that need to jump out of airplanes. This rifle gives the sniper the ability to move in cramped conditions, make a jump, land, then effectively do his or her job… Based on the article, more effectively.

It’s easier to operate, has less recoil, and has above average accuracy.

From The Army Times:

“The rifle is easier to shoot and has less recoil, all while shooting the same round as the M110. [Additionally,] the CSASS has increased accuracy, which equates to higher hit percentages at longer ranges,” Yarosh said.

The newest CSASS not only has a shorter barrel, but also an adjustable stock for easier transport and comfort.

“The CSASS is much shorter and lighter than our current system, which will make long dismounted movements and reaction to contact more efficient,” said Spc. Nicholas Farmer, a sniper in C Troop, 1st Battalion, 73rd Cavalry Regiment.

Most M4s max out at near 300 meters, but the CSASS allows shooters to reach out to 600 meters. The new rifle can fire the M80A1 Enhanced Performance Round and the XM1158 Advanced Armor Piercing Round.

The Army is increasingly shifting to urban operations, despite the push to do training in all environments… Against multiple types of enemies. Add jumps to the mix, and the physics involved with dropping with equipment, maintaining weapon accuracy is a must.

You could read a lot more details about this on Army Times.

Category: Army

Comments (22)

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  1. Sapper3307 says:

    Who will be the first paratrooper to get a report of survey for burning one in on a jump? Accidently releasing the HPT lowering line from the harness vs lowering the expensive equipment on the HPT lowering line.

  2. Roh-Dog says:

    Wow, a whole 600 meters?!?
    So I guess this system will not be used for qual or the ‘final shot’ at Burroughs Range?
    Thumbs up.

    • RCAF-CHAIRBORNE says:

      Shit….you could do that with an Enfield rifled musket! Certainly with a Whitworth!

      • 5th/77th FA says:

        Yeah, just ask “Big John” Sedgwick @ Spotsylvania Court House. Oh wait…never mind.

  3. Sapper3307 says:

    XM1158 AP ammo $13 a shot.
    Sounds like Navy purchase.
    sarc

  4. Slow Joe says:

    I didn’t read.
    TD,DR, too long, didn’t read.

    But if that is the M110A1, it is going to everey IBCT infantry brigade combat team, as the new SDM squad designated marksman.

    I had it in my hands last wwek, and it is far most slick and better designedd than the original M110.

    Biggest diferences I noticed was that the can/suppressor is much more effective, similar to the one on the M2010, and the scope was simplified, losing th3 mildot half-tack crossed hair by replacing it with a balistic estimator that will probably be easier to use, but cannot match a true mildot reticle.

    Also, the dudes working on this toy claim accuracy is 1.25 MOA, whichh falls short of the 1.0 MOA in the M24 and M2010.

    Think of this as an M110 dumbed down to replace all those M14 EBRs still in service with the line units as SDM.

    • Slow Joe says:

      After looking closely at the pic, it doesn’t look loke the M110A1.
      The scope looks like an M3A2 Leopold and cheeck guard is different.

      • Roh-Dog says:

        I’m pretty sure that scope is an S&B, read the rear and the windage cap has that ringdot logo.
        The article states the SIG tango 1-6x will be standard issue on this thing, imho it is pretty decent glass but the 24mm obj lens leaves something to be desired re light transmission.
        I guess that’s why the Infantry God gave grunts Thermals.

  5. Slow Joe says:

    After looking closely at the pic, it doesn’t look loke the M110A1.
    The scope looks like an M3A2 Leopold and cheeck guard is different.

  6. Your Army
    This unit’s going airborne with the Army’s newest sniper rifle
    By: Todd South   20 hours ago
    777

    Snipers assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division conduct zeroing exercises with the Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System prior to the first airborne infiltration operational tests of what could potentially be the Army’s newest sniper system. (Chris OLeary/Army)
    Soldiers with the 82nd Airborne recently conducted tests of the Army’s newest offering for a compact sniper rifle — and they liked it.

    Earlier this month snipers with the 82nd at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, put the Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System through airborne infiltration test trials.

    One of the Operational Test Command’s Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate NCOs, Sgt. 1st Class Ross Martin, said in a release that the compact nature of the rifle is appealing to airborne forces who have to maneuver their equipment in cramped planes for jumps.

    Typically, the longer-barrel standard rifles can be cumbersome.

    SOCOM snipers will ditch their bullets for this new round next year
    SOCOM snipers will ditch their bullets for this new round next year
    The top Special Operations Forces snipers will replace their 7.62mm sniper rifles with a the 6.5mm Creedmoor, which doubles their hit probability at 1,000m, increases their effective range by nearly half, reduces wind drift by a third and has less recoil.

    By: Todd South
    “Current sniper systems are equipped with 20-inch barrels, sound suppression systems and full-length stocks that provide accuracy and a stable firing platform required of any precision rifle,” said David Parris, a CSASS trainer with U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command’s Soldier Weapons Support.

    As the Army shifts focus to dense urban environments the equipment, such as the sniper rifle, follow suit.

    “The CSASS is smaller, lighter, and more ergonomic, as the majority of the changes were requested by the soldiers themselves,” said Victor Yarosh told Army Times in 2018. Yarosh works on the Army’s Soldier Weapons program.

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    “The rifle is easier to shoot and has less recoil, all while shooting the same round as the M110. [Additionally,] the CSASS has increased accuracy, which equates to higher hit percentages at longer ranges,” Yarosh said.

    The newest CSASS not only has a shorter barrel, but also an adjustable stock for easier transport and comfort.

    “The CSASS is much shorter and lighter than our current system, which will make long dismounted movements and reaction to contact more efficient,” said Spc. Nicholas Farmer, a sniper in C Troop, 1st Battalion, 73rd Cavalry Regiment.

    Most M4s max out at near 300 meters, but the CSASS allows shooters to reach out to 600 meters. The new rifle can fire the M80A1 Enhanced Performance Round and the XM1158 Advanced Armor Piercing Round.

    A Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System, CSASS, awaits its operator before a post-drop live fire exercise at Gryphon Group Range, N.C. (Chris OLeary/Army)
    A Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System, CSASS, awaits its operator before a post-drop live fire exercise at Gryphon Group Range, N.C. (Chris OLeary/Army)
    It has a different buttstock and barrel twist than previous CSASS models, comes in just under 10 pounds and uses a Sig Sauer Tango 6 variable 1×6 power scope.

    Spc. William Holland, a sniper with 2nd BN, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, said that the rifle is “lightweight and compact, [which] makes for a more manageable load during post drop operations.”

    Being airborne, the soldiers rely on maintaining their weapon’s optic zero, given the jostling and sometimes hard impact nature of their jobs.

    To measure how well the CSASS maintains that zero, the test team used a mobile weapons bore sight collimator to ensure the “pre-mission” zero was not degraded by parachute infiltration shock.

    Once this data was collected, snipers conducted a known distance live fire after static line and military free fall operations.

    Military Times reported in January that Special Operations Command snipers will soon use the Sig Sauer TANGO6T 1-6×24 Riflescope for their CSASS.

    Sig Sauer also won the optic competition for the Army’s Squad Designated Marksman Rifle with their TANGO6 scope.

    The SDMR program has been part of a larger shift for the Army to put sniper-like capabilities inside of the squad, giving the base unit of the formation more range and lethality with its M110 Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper System, or CSASS.

    Tactically, Army leaders see the sniper as a force enhancer because they can conduct a number of missions.

    “They provide a surveillance mission where they use their high-powered scope to observe activity downrange,” Yarosh said. “A sniper can pin down an enemy force through sniper concealment and engagement to provide the right shots at the right time. They can also prevent an enemy force from moving out of cover, which allows our maneuver forces to exploit the enemy by moving into a better position and engage.”

    777
    About
    this
    Author
    About Todd South
    Todd South is a Marine veteran of the Iraq War. He has written about crime, courts, government and military issues for multiple publications since 2004. In 2014, he was named a Pulitzer finalist for local reporting on a project he co-wrote about witness problems in gang criminal cases. Todd covers ground combat for Military Times.

  7. 11B-Mailclerk says:

    A sad effect of all these dumb-ass “gun control” laws is the near death of innovation in firearms.

    Can’t make those, didn’t pay tax, oh -heck- no no no….

    This BS is killing troops, by leaving them stuck with 40s-60s tech, repackaged.

    The pictured weapon is a product-improved AR-15, modded. That isn’t “new”.

    You could get MOA ARs in the 1990s.

    • Roh-Dog says:

      For semiautomatic rifle platforms the AR is pretty damn good. Unfortunately there is a trade off between; cost, reliability, and accuracy.
      The AR has been around since the 50’s, I’d bet real money that as long as we use gunpowder they’ll be our main rifle. Not perfect but perfectly capable at doing its job.

  8. Anonymous says:

    AR platform in 7.62 NATO… sweet. (Can we get a 7.62 NATO M4A1 now?)

  9. The Army’s newest weapon system; the compact ass.

  10. Thunderstixx says:

    The AR-10 is available in the .308 caliber and that rifle seems to be about the most copied and reproduced rifle in the history of firearms.
    The rifle is available in almost every caliber of ammunition available on the worldwide market.
    I used to have one, but it was destroyed in the Austin Hurricane that flooded the entire apartment complex I live in.
    It was a nice rifle, but it didn’t float so it was washed away like all my other firearms….
    Seriously, the AR platform is a very good design of a firearm and it is no wonder the US Military is planning on staying with it.
    If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it…

  11. David says:

    SCAR 205. 3/4 MOA, any reasonable range, about $4k. If minute of asshole out to a kilometer is insufficient, you are in deep shit.

  12. AKanonymoose says:

    So it’s a modified HK417 is RAL 8000 baby sh** brown. This contract is how HK is still not bankrupt for the time being.

    In other news HK still hates you and you suck.