Coins Stolen from Fallen Navy SEAL Grave

| July 13, 2021

The website kkyr.com reports that coins were taken from a gravesite for U.S. Navy SEAL Adam L. Brown.  They are asking for the coins to be returned.

Military Coins Stolen From Arkansas Navy SEAL Grave Site

About a couple of months ago I did a story about an underwater memorial to fallen U.S. Navy SEAL and Hot Springs, Arkansas native Adam L. Brown for the scuba diving community. Sad news to report but around the end of June,  Adam’s family discovered that the coins and other items that have been placed at Adam’s gravesite on land had been stolen.

The family is asking if you know of someone or somebody who may have been involved in taking the coins to please return them by calling Will Stevens at 501-744-7422, the individual or individuals that took the coins will remain anonymous.  Stevens says the family would just like to have them back. The family wants the person or persons who are responsible to know that we mean them no ill will or harm and are praying that God will give them the courage to return the items with the promise that they can remain unknown.

Yeah, it was probably just a huge mistake and misunderstanding.  I will, however, be pleasantly surprised if they are returned.

Brown was Killed in Action in Afghanistan in 2010.

US Navy SEAL Adam Brown

Years ago, on July 27th, 2013 a group of Arkansas Scuba Divers helped place an underwater memorial for Chief Special Warfare Operator Adam Lee Brown, who was a U. S. Navy SEAL, and Hot Springs, Arkansas native. Adam’s life was the subject of the book, “Fearless: The Undaunted Courage and Ultimate Sacrifice of Navy SEAL Team SIX Operator Adam Brown”.  The memorial was placed at Blakely Dam in Lake Ouachita in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and is accessible to both land and boat-based divers. In memory of Adam and the way he lived his life, the memorial is known as “Fearless Rock,” is funded entirely by private donations.

A movie is being made called “Fearless” which is based on the book.

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Category: "Teh Stoopid", Afghanistan

Comments (29)

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  1. Hatchet says:

    It’s takes a particularly low brand of low-life speak to ill of the dead, but to steal from the ‘last place of sacred rest’ of a decorated Veteran, goes light years beyond the reference of ‘Despicable’. I believe that if/when this grave-side thief is caught, they’re given a choice as to which body-part they will be required to amputate(unanesthetized). Similar to the reference in the movie ‘Kill Bill’ – it should be something they’ll REALLY miss!!

    • KoB says:

      Beyond despicable is spot on Hatchet. I could get very creative with the forms of punishment meted out to these low lifes. A complete and total breakdown of proper Home Training and the knowledge that there will be no true punishment is what has led to this kinda crap.

      Cocksuckers!

    • Steve says:

      What is f****** wrong with these people??

      What could that coin possibly mean for you? Coins like that are a little memento for people, meaning that once they’ve moved on to other things, they can look at it, smile, think to themselves ‘I did that’, and remember.

      For the ****s that stole it, it’ll only ever be a reminder of what a shitbag you are. WHY THE F*** would you want to remind yourself of that?

      I don’t get it.

  2. STSC(SW/SS) says:

    I hope Chief Brown rises from the grave to cut this fucker’s balls off.

  3. E4 Mafia '83-'87 says:

    The type of scumbag that does that will not give them back willingly. My guess is they stole them, and then flashed them around as belong to them. Let’s hope the other people who have seen the stolen coins let the right people know who has them.

    • Carlton says:

      More than likely the thief took the coins to a pawn shop. If he got money for them then the coins are at the pawn shop. If the thief didn’t get money for the coins, he probably just threw them away.

  4. Green Thumb says:

    Thanks for the post.

    Maybe we should pass the hat again here at TAH?

    We have done it before for the Lemonade Incident.

  5. M48DAT says:

    Bad juju to steal from a grave, something terrible is going to happen.

    I’m in for passing the hat.

  6. Ex-PH2 says:

    Scumbags. Lotta bad karma in this.

  7. Only Army Mom says:

    While visiting a National cemetery, I watched a couple 9-10 year old kids running around checking headstones for coins. They were with a large group of adults (12-15 people) who were there on the birthday of a soldier who recently died active duty. The adults were not paying attention to the kids, who at first appeared to just be looking at the other graves.

    Because it is always the case, a couple of the females acted like it was no big deal and initially got mouthy with me. “What’s the big deal? You leave money and expect it not to get taken? Mind yo business, etc.” Fortunately, a couple of the adults understood and were beside themselves trying to figure out how to return the coins to the proper headstones. Big Momma took her shoe off and literally beat those two kids back to their car while explaining to the formerly mouthy females “You a disgrace, I know you was raised right”.

    The point of my story is, this very well could have been kids who didn’t understand the significance of their actions, beyond it being simply wrong. This wasn’t at a National cemetery so the possibility it was just kids being disrespectful deviants is even higher. I also admit it is possible it was the intentional disrespect of antifa-loving CoD warrior soi bois or some stolen valor POS who will spin amazing tales of derring-do to explain possession of the challenge coins and other items.

    Regardless of who the perpetrator was, I fear bringing lots of attention to this act will be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, more people may become aware of the meaning and respect these types of items left at gravesites. On the other hands, scumbags will have identified another way to intentionally disrespect our military and veterans.

    Epilogue – I suggested to Big Momma the kids be told to write apology notes and leave them at each of the headstones they disrespected. Or, take them to the cemetery office and let the kids explain themselves there. I think either of those punishments was going to be less than what Big Momma had in store for them.

    • A Proud Infidel®™️ says:

      I hear you OAM, and it makes me wonder whether that was done by someone ignorant of what they were doing or some scumbag who saw something they could use to steal Valor or hock for a few dollars? I commend you for what you did in that situation and in the past we’ve seen where certain ghouls would comb cemeteries stealing bronze decorations to sell to some scrap dealers, right now as I see it we just don’t know right now but if it was stolen by someone wanting to steal valor or sell it, then I’m all for vigilante Justice!

    • Skyjumper says:

      OAM, I agree with you about it could have been kids that took the coins or I would like to think, that the coins were also possibly removed by the cemetery staff and placed in a fund to be used for the burial of an indigent veteran who cannot otherwise pay for the process. This is a common practice. Now if somebody truly stole those coins, then they should burn in hell.

      A very good female friend of mine who at one time I served with ( she a retired CSM), has been for years going the extra mile to help out veterans and their families.
      She gives a lot of her time & money to honor & support these people in any way she can.

      A short story.
      A few years ago, she came up with this idea of cleaning veterans headstones in the area.
      She started out at first doing it by herself, but as word got out, people began volunteering.
      Sometimes she has had as many as thirty helpers, other times she is just by herself.
      Boy Scouts & Eagle Scouts have also helped her out.
      She always contacts the cemetery staff first, and has never been turned away.

      A couple of weeks back, she & I went to a small Jewish cemetery to clean headstones.
      As we were taking the cleaning supplies out of our vehicles, we noticed that on top of some headstones were small stones. We both looked at each other with a “now what” look, but then decided that we would remove the stones form the veterans grave, place them in a small pile alongside of the headstone, and then after we were done cleaning, we would place them back from where they were. We do the same thing with any coins we find on top of the headstones. We did somewheres near 30 headstones that day. It was a tiring day what with being in the sun most of the time, getting sprayed from the cleaner & water and grassy knee stains…………but it was very rewarding and worth it.

      The process:
      1) After trimming up the grass around the headstone, it is than liberally sprayed with D2 ( see link below), and then allowed to set for 10 minutes.
      2) With a bucket of water, a stiff nylon bristle brush and a few toothbrushes, the headstone is scrubbed with the larger brush and the toothbrushes used for the numbers & letters. Then it is hosed off with water. In the case of some small cemeteries that don’t have running water, she brings jugs of water with her that is used in a pump-up weed killer sprayer.
      3) In some cases the headstone is sprayed again with the D2, allowed to set, and the brush process is repeated. It is than rinsed one last time after which a light spraying of the D2 is done to slow down any aging or dirt.

      The D2 is very expensive, costing around $50.00 per gallon.

      So far in the past two years or so, this woman (and at times with helpers) have cleaned near 2000 headstones. She seeks no personal recognition…..she does it for the vets & their families.

      A few links below to D2 cleaner, the meaning of coins on veteran headstones and stones on Jewish headstones.

      http://d2bio.com

      https://www.jewishfuneralsusa.com/2019/04/02/jews-stones-graves/

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitation_stones

      https://www.wearethemighty.com/mighty-culture/coin-on-headstone/

  8. Skippy says:

    I hate Meth Heads

  9. Hatchet says:

    ‘A movie is being made called “Fearless” which is based on the book.’ After checking out the book, I decided I needed to know a bit more about Chief Petty Officer Adam Brown. Not surprisingly, CPO Brown’s story is enthralling –

    How an addict became a Navy SEAL and a nightmare for the Taliban
    ———————————
    The biographies of most Navy SEAL’s probably don’t include a rap sheet — theft, possession of meth, possession of crack, and so on. But if there’s ever been a story of redemption through continued hard work and perseverance, it belongs to Adam Brown. Facing 11 felony drug and weapons charges after being found in a pool of his own blood, he opted into a drug rehab program — which only worked for a short while.

    His best chance at turning his life around came in the form of a SEAL trident. Brown’s life began like so many other good-ol’ American boys before him. The Arkansas native was a straight-A student and star football player. He was kind, respectful to his elders, and always ready for good natured fun. It wasn’t until he met an old flame that his descent into addiction began. She had a drug habit and, though Brown enjoyed a drink, he wasn’t inclined toward anything harder than that. Eventually, his girlfriend wore him down and he was hooked after one hit of crack-cocaine.

    From there, he devolved into injecting it into his veins. Then, he began to try other drugs. Eventually, he could only be found on the floors of crack houses. He hit rock bottom when the girl who helped get him hooked eventually left and he began stabbing himself in the neck with a knife. When police found him, he was laying in a pool of his own blood. That’s when they discovered all his outstanding warrants. Facing massive jail time and a family that was done with his addictive behaviors, the judge gave him the choice: rehab or jail.

    It was in rehab that Brown gave his life over to Christianity and met his soon-to-be wife, also a fervent believer. The two were happy, but Brown soon regressed. After a short disappearance, his new bride found him in a crack house. Addiction is a viscous and persistent curse, and this same scenario repeated itself until his new love threatened to leave.

    By 1998, he knew he had to do something, so he stopped into a recruiter’s office after finding out a friend was joining the Navy as an aviator. The recruiter balked when Brown revealed his drug use and rap sheet, but Brown had a friend in a high place: the highest-ranking recruiting officer in the region. He vouched for Brown, who was almost immediately shipped out to basic training.

    He showed up with just the clothes on his back and went straight for SEAL training.

    He was sent to SEAL Team Four, where he ended up with a knife in his eye due to a training accident. He covered the wound and continued on, eventually having to have the eye stitched up due to a loss of blood. He later lost his right eye — his dominant eye — during a room-clearing exercise and still he pressed on. He just learned to shoot with his left eye in SEAL sniper school.

    Even with a 50-percent washout rate among those with two eyes, Adam Brown succeeded. He decided he wanted to join what he thought was the best of the best: SEAL Team Six. While waiting for the right time to train with SEAL Team Six, he took a deployment to Afghanistan in 2005, where a freak convoy accident left his right hand mangled and missing fingers. Instead of tending to his own wounds, he tended to others and pulled security until the last casualty was evacuated from the site.
    When you can’t shoot with your dominant hand, just use the other hand.

    With his dominant eye and his dominant hand both out, Brown did exactly what you’d expect him to do: he simply learned to work with his other hand. For a year, he made history as the only SEAL to ever attempt (let alone pass) the training with only one eye. And he was shooting almost-perfect scores.

    By November, 2006, Brown was Chief Petty Officer Brown and the following years saw more hardship and deployments for the SEAL. He bore the pain of arthritis, a bad back, a broken leg, and surgery on both ankles so he could return to combat duty. He deployed to Afghanistan’s Kunar Valley and to the cities and villages all over Iraq, going on nightly raids chasing IED bomb-makers. Brown was only 33.
    Navy SEAL Adam Brown personally went out of his way to hand out shoes and socks to Afghan kids in need.

    (NavySEALs.com)

    His final deployment came in March of 2010. Their mission was to kill or capture a high-value Taliban leader, code-named Objective Lake James. Just like the bomb-makers in Iraq, the target was responsible for the deaths of many American and NATO soldiers. Flying into the mountains of Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush via Chinook Helicopter, Brown and the other STS SEALs fast-roped into the area and humped to a nearby village.

    As the SEALs approached a stronghold, they managed to silently take out an enemy sentry, but another fired at the SEALs with his AK-47. As the area opened up with small arms fire, the SEAL Team needed to get a grenade in a nearby window. It was close, but not close enough to throw one in. As Brown made his way around with a grenade launcher, shots rang out to his left, riddling the determined SEAL with bullets. He was hit in both legs. Once he was down, other enemy positions poured bullets toward him.
    His fellow SEALs got him out of the line of fire, but it would not be enough to save Adam Brown’s life. He died later that day, back at the base.

    Though Brown’s story ends in his tragic death, it’s nonetheless a story about the power of human will in overcoming any challenge. Brown showed us that you can always shape your life in any way you want, and all it takes is the love and support of your family, friends, and the people who will always have your back. Fearless is a fitting name for his story – there was nothing in life that Adam Brown couldn’t overcome to shape his own destiny.

    Read about Brown’s struggle against addiction along with all his combat successes and failures in Fearless: The Undaunted Courage and Ultimate Sacrifice of Navy SEAL Team Six Operator Adam Brown, by Eric Blehm.

    https://www.wearethemighty.com/mighty-trending/navy-seal-adam-brown-fearless/

    and

    https://www.investors.com/seal-adam-brown-terrified-bad-guys/?src=3MC701044

    WTF?!!! Steal?!!!! From this HERO’S FINAL RESTING PLACE?!!!! Man, I can’t even begin to try imagine just how much bad karma one would accrue for stealing from this Man’s final resting place. May the person(or people) guilty of this theft BE FOREVER TORMENTED AND NEVER KNOW A SINGLE DAY’S PEACE!!!

    • Skippy says:

      Epic !!!!!

    • SFC D says:

      I had no clue you could fit that much badassery into one human being.

    • Steve says:

      Handing in my man card.

      • Hatchet says:

        Nah! *chuckle* Know what you mean though – a very rare Dude Extraordinaire… First thought I had after finishing reading both articles while shaking my head in amazement: Wow, this guy’s story parallels what General George Patton stated “It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather, we should THANK GOD THAT SUCH MEN LIVED”.

        And now that I’ve come to somewhat better understand Chief Petty Officer Brown’s background, I’m two-fisted fuck’n PISSED that some POS would violate the sanctity of such a place and as you allude to Steve, the memory and deeds of such an incredible Man.

        • Steve says:

          100%. I’m really hoping it’s as OAM suggests above: That it was just a couple of kids who weren’t thinking or don’t understand the significance.

  10. sbalm says:

    If you folks want to donate just do it through the regular MP / TAH / VG donation channel and put a note in that it is for the Adam Brown Donation.

    Once compiled, we’ll send a check to the most appropriate person in his family and say it is from “This Ain’t Hell | Valor Guardians.”

    It is important that you put a note about the Adam Brown Donation collection, or we may figure you were donating to MP | TAH | VG – not that there’s anything wrong with that.

    I have to figure out if they are accepting donations for the memorial or the family, so the money donated is the most appropriate.

  11. Dustoff says:

    I can only hope that the ghost of a Spec Warfare Operator enters this slimy dickweeds room one night, pokes him/her with Neptune’s spear, and when they sit up in bed, shaking with fear and pissing their pajamas, the spirit says” ” About those coins asshole”!